Name Analysis

Taron

Gender: Masculine
Usage: Welsh Mythology, Welsh (Rare), English (British, Rare), Cornish (Rare), Literature, History, Pictish
Pronounced: Tar-UN

Variant of Taran. Derived from the Welsh and Cornish words for “thunder”.

Taran is mentioned in the Welsh Mabinogion, a fact that gave rise to the theory that both the figure and the name might be faint memories of the Celtic god Taranis.

This thunder-god is also the source of the name of Taran mac Ainftech, a Pictish king from the 7th century.

In the literary world, Taran is the central character in Lloyd Alexander’s Chronicles of Prydain (1964-1968).

David

Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, Hebrew, French, Scottish, Spanish, Portuguese, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch, Czech, Slovene, Russian, Croatian, Serbian, Macedonian, Romanian, Biblical, Biblical Latin
Pronounced: DAY-vid (English), dah-VEED (Hebrew), DA-VEED (French), da-BEEDH (Spanish), DA-vit (German), DAH-vid (Swedish, Norwegian), DAH-vit (Dutch), du-VYEET (Russian)

From the Hebrew name דָּוִד (Dawid), which was derived from Hebrew דּוֹד (dod) meaning “beloved” or “uncle”. David was the second and greatest of the kings of Israel, ruling in the 10th century BC. Several stories about him are told in the Old Testament, including his defeat of Goliath, a giant Philistine. According to the New Testament, Jesus was descended from him.

This name has been used in Britain since the Middle Ages. It has been especially popular in Wales, where it is used in honour of the 5th-century patron saint of Wales (also called Dewi), as well as in Scotland, where it was borne by two kings. Famous bearers include empiricist philosopher David Hume (1711-1776), explorer David Livingstone (1813-1873), musician David Bowie (1947-2016), and soccer player David Beckham (1975-). This is also the name of the hero of Charles Dickens’ semi-autobiographical novel ‘David Copperfield’ (1850).

Egerton

Usage: English
Pronounced: Eh-ger-ten

Variant of Edgerton. Derived from the Old English personal name Ecghere and tun, a word which meant enclosure, farm, or settlement, and later came to mean fort, and then town. The name would translate as farm belonging to Ecghere.